Choosing the right professional

17 11 2011

AMA

Having the correct person to turn to when you need specific answers, that can often be the difference between efficiency and disaster.  You wouldn’t necessarily ask a lumberjack where to buy the freshest pastries in town, right?  You could but we’re not sure you’d be likely to receive the best answer.  Is it possible that particular man or woman might actually specialize in confectionery arts?  Yes.  Would your odds improve if you were to ask the same question of a baker?  Of course, and for obvious reasons.

OK, so that’s not very challenging logic.  Now, what if you were to line up five doctors left to right, all with the exact same lab coat.  Could you easily choose which one might be right for you?  Are you sure?  Tell us, which of the available factors would most determine your final choice?  What we all have available to us immediately are physical characteristics.  While those may in fact lead us in the right direction, they can also be very deceiving.  Play this out with us for a minute…

What if there were 3 females and 2 males, would you have a predisposition with choosing one over the other?  You might, or not, but do you know why?  Chances are you’ve at some point had a favorable experience with one group more than another.  That may be something you find instantly comforting and you wouldn’t be wrong for feeling this way, but would that be enough to know you’ve selected the correct person(s)?  Perhaps, but not necessarily.  What if you gravitated to one of the males in search of better answers regarding complications you’re feeling in your chest, only to find that both of the men are brain surgeons.  What are the odds that scenario would end well?  While there may be a small chance one or both of them might know enough to find their way around your heart and the surrounding area (after all, med school these days isn’t small potatoes!), having them tend to your care wouldn’t be your best choice.

OK, so you get the point… you really benefit from knowing a great deal more than what is viewable to the naked eye.  But how exactly do you acquire this additional information?  YOU ASK.  You wouldn’t trust just any run of the mill medical student with your life so why would you potentially do the equivalent with care of your vehicle(s)?  Bottom line, you wouldn’t, or at least you shouldn’t.

Just the same as you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover (yes, yet once again our parents were right), we don’t expect you to know that our automotive technicians are maintenance and repair specialists.  There isn’t any way you would reasonably conclude that’s the case unless you ASKED questions.  With that said, we encourage you to interview us.  Please ask us the questions you would like answers to because we understand the importance of making the right decision.  Why do we have such a clear idea of how significant (not to mention sensitive) an issue this can become?  Because it’s what WE DO when faced with the very same challenge, and empowering our customers to make informed decisions is what we’ve been about for over 36 years.

We don’t have medical degrees, nor should we if we’re working on vehicles.  But make no mistake about it, we approach this science with the same amount of passion, commitment, and focus as new and veteran health professionals alike.  It’s what we do and who we are, and the reason for that is because it’s also what we LOVE doing.

It makes perfect sense that you might be preoccupied with comparison and weighing pros and cons of doing business with one party over another.  We get that, but we just want to make certain that you’re asking qualifying questions so the service centers you’re considering can be measured equally, and that includes but is not limited to proper discovery of specialties.  If a specific practitioner (in the example above) has chosen to emphasize and target one area of their practice, wouldn’t you want to know that?  Yes, and not only would this be valuable information but it might immediately eliminate other potential candidates for whom you felt may be equally qualified.

We’ll come back to this theme on the next blog entry, where we’d like to point out some of the noticeable differences between a team that approaches challenges with the mentality of a technician, as opposed to that of a specialist.  We believe you’ll better understand (and hopefully appreciate) the tireless dedication and standards we hold ourselves to on a regular basis.  It isn’t easy but we’ve accepted to make the necessary sacrifices for your benefit.  It’s what we believe you not only deserve but should also expect.

Stay tuned…

As always, in the meantime we’re available via web, facebook, e-mail, or phone (616.774.7048).  You decide what medium works best for you and we’ll be here when you need us.

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2 responses

21 11 2011
Tom

Good advice, but what questions to ask? Often we don’t want to look silly by asking a “dumb” question. A good question might be, “what should I ask you about these repairs”? If the technician can walk me through that one I know I have someone I can work with.

21 11 2011
communityauto

Yes, very good point. Glad you didn’t suggest an example to the effect of “my car/truck is making this noise, can you tell me what’s wrong with it?” Too often we’re expected to “diagnose” a concern sight unseen. That is not only asking for trouble but potentially accepting additional liability, too.

Thankfully, in your suggestion you recommend “what should I ASK you?” This is not only a fair question but one that sets the stage for genuine discovery. It gives the service advisor the opportunity for role reversal, which assists in them relating better to whatever concern the customer may have.

A few other examples of good questions are:

What are my options?
Do you guarantee your work?
Have you seen a lot of these vehicles with similar issues – is there a trend?

There are several others, and we’re really strong proponents of each question having its own potential value.
This is often known as “the only dumb question is not asking one if/when you feel the need.”

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